Creative Tip: The Definitive Stripping Guide to the Hyaku Shiki 2.0

IMG_2539.JPG

 

Since I'm planning on building a Hyaku Shiki 2.0 after my current project, I thought I'd look into what can strip the plating. I've seen many different suggestions and tips, but most have been second hand information that people have "heard" would work. With that in mind, I wanted to find out definitively what works and what doesn't. Here are my findings.


Preparation

I gathered some of the more common chemicals that I've seen used online and some that I thought might have a chance at stripping the plating off the Skiki 2.0. So I gathered Simple Green, 91% Isopropyl Alchohol, Windex, Bleach, and Zep Fast 505 Industrial Degreaser (similar to Purple Power).


Simple Green

 I had seen claims that this was a great paint stripper and that some people were using to strip the Shiki 2.0. I've never had any sort of luck with this, so I was not hopeful for it's chances.

91% Isopropyl Alcohol

This was the wild card of the bunch. It's my go to chemical for stripping Mr. Color and anything laqceur based, but how would it fare against the plating of the Shiki 2.0?

Windex

Another wildcard, but with the mix of different chemicals in Windex, like alcohol and amonia, I wanted to see how it would fare.

 

bleach

I've also seen a good number of claims of this stripping the plating of the Shiki 2.0, but I was not conviced, so why not put it to the test?

Zep Fast 505

This is an industrial cleaner and degreaser, similar to Purple Power. I had not tried it in the past and had seen many claims that Purple Power did great at stripping the Shiki 2.0, so I was looking forward to see what the results were.

 

Testing - 90 minutes results


simple green

Little to no effect on the part. No signs of missing plating or degradation in color.

91% Isopropyl Alcohol

Surprisingly the gold color had been stripped away to reveal a very nice silver plating. The actual plating had not been penetrated which was interesting.

windex

Slight chipping and color degradation.

 

bleach

Little to no effect on the part. No signs of missing plating or degradation in color.

zep fast 505

This is the most aggressive by far. A good amount of chipping has already started.

 

Testing - 7 Hour Results


simple gree

This just did not have any effect on the plating at all. The gold color was still vibrant and no chipping had occurred.

91% Isopropyl Alcohol

The gold color has been dissolved and slight chipping had occurred at the seven hour mark. Not the most efficient stripper, but if you wanted to have a silver or candy color shiki, this might be an easy way of achieving it.

windex

Medium amounts of stripping had occurred by the seven hour mark. I would suspect that if it was left in longer that it would strip the plating completely.

 

bleach

Minor chipping at the seven hour mark, but not as efficient a stripper as some of the other chemicals.

zep fast 505

This is the clear winner by a large margin. At the seven hour mark all signs of plating have been eliminated with no ill effect to the plastic. It's not brittle, or soft. This will easily and quickly take off the Hyaku Shiki 2.0 plating and leave you with a nice bare plastic to paint over. I would suspect that any industrial strength degreaser (Purple Power) would have the same characteristics as the brand that I tried.

 

conclusion

Keep in mind that formulations and chemical strengths will vary from country to country and even state to state, so you may experience different results where you live, but as far as I can tell the industrial strength degreaser is the clear winner in this contest. I highly recommend it if you're looking to strip the plating off your Hyaku Shiki 2.0!


time lapse